Woody Paige’s School Of Journaliffen: Chapter 3

Wednesday morning Woody Paige confirmed - a second time - to Denver’s Westword magazine that a 2009 Dan Le Batard plagiarism claim against him over a 1995 Super Bowl column was untrue.

Woody Paige: Around the Horn and Denver Post

With Paige now doubly certain that he did not plagiarize or fabricate his Jan. 29, 1995, Denver Post column despite multiple, unconfirmed factual details of the piece and and its striking similarity to Le Batard’s Jan. 27, 1995, article, in deference to verified denials made by the venerable Denver Post columnist I have decided to verify Paige’s own claims of unfailing accuracy in his past work for the Post.

Everyday.

As noted here Tuesday, a web-based search of the Denver Post archives between 1993-2010 for the term “iffen” yielded four search results - all Paige-penned local color pieces prefacing a major sporting event. Three of those were from past Super Bowls, including Atlanta in January, 1994.

To set the Peach State Super Bowl week scene for his Colorado readership, Paige claimed a Tallulah Falls, Ga., dateline on a Jan. 28, 1994, Denver Post column headlined, “Georgia Dome may as well be the Taj Mahal.

Tallulah Falls is located roughly two miles from the South Carolina border, in extreme Northeast Georgia. Paige chose that somewhat inaccesible, though tourist-friendly locale because the area was the setting for the 1972 movie Deliverance.

I’ve excerpted a selection of the Jan. 28, 1994, column published by Denver Post below, with Paige’s copy in italic and my comments in bold.

The Denver Post

January 28, 1994

Georgia Dome may as well be the Taj Mahal

Author: WOODY PAIGE

Edition: Final
Section: Sports
Page: 1D

Article Text:

“The river opened and was there. It was gray-green, very clear and yet with a certain milkiness, too; it looked as though it would turn white and foam at rocks more easily than other water.” - James Dickey

Woody Paige quotes the book Deliverance

Paige’s Denver Post piece is prefaced by the above quote, which can be found on Page 70 of the novel “Deliverance”. James Dickey’s best-selling work of fiction was the inspiration for the 1972 feature film.

TALLULAH FALLS, Ga. - Rain machine-guns the tin roof.

National Weather Service-verified weather reports for the Tallulah Falls, Ga., region reported zero (0.00) precipitation for the days Jan. 26, 1994, Jan. 27, 1994 and Jan. 28, 1994.

In contrast, rain emanating from overcast weather conditions was a prevalent theme throughout the fictional film Deliverance, which Paige directly references throughout his Denver Post column.

It’s so opaque sunlight probably has to be brought in by 18-wheeler.

It doesn’t matter here what kind of hair spray Jimmy Johnson uses or which Charles Dickens book Marv Levy is reading.

They could care less about Emmitt Smith’s shoulder or Troy Aikman’s concussion.

The Cowboys are just no-good Texas trash, and the Bills are Yankee carpetbaggers who don’t know spit.

There are no blimps, no corporate cocktail parties, no cluster-grab press conferences, no ESPN, no Bud Bowls, no canapes, no limousines, no thousand-dollar tickets for sale.

Ralph, with the bad teeth, down at the boat house, seems unconcerned that Buffalo has lost three straight Super Bowls.

The four main cast members in the fictional film Deliverance were Burt Reynolds, Ned Beatty, Ronny Cox and Jon Voight, but perhaps the most-noted (and notorious) role in the movie was played by an actor named Herbert Coward.

Coward’s nameless character is officially referred to by the film’s producers as, “Toothless Man.

It was Coward’s “Toothless Man” who uttered the now infamous phrase to Ned Beatty’s “Bobby: “[grinning] He got a real pretty mouth ain’t he?

“Really?” he said. “Ain’t that somethin’?”

To most people in Rabun County, the Cowboys and the Bills are a couple of dueling banjos. The Super Bowl and the Middle East aren’t big news here.

“Dueling Banjos” was a chart-topping instrumental song heard in the film Deliverance

“Got work to do,” Ralph said. “Football games are for other folks.”

There are no Bills T-shirts and Cowboys caps at the Green Shutters Inn, only hot biscuits and sausage gravy and a cup of coffee that looks and tastes like it was poured out of a car’s crankcase.

Though the “Green Shutters Inn” in the Paige-referenced area no longer exists, there was a restaurant by that name in nearby Tiger, Georgia at the time Paige’s column was published.

Super Bowl is the homemade chili.

“I heard somebody was going to Atlanta for the game, but I’m not sure,” the waitress says. “Who’s playing? Maybe iffen it was Clemson and Georgia Tech, I might be interested. Might not. I work on Sundays.”

In 1992 and 1993, Georgia Tech’s football team went 5-6. In 1994, it went 1-10.

Georgia Tech's 1994 Record: 1-10

The University of Georgia is located 64 miles from Tallulah Falls. Georgia Tech is in Atlanta, 109 miles from Tallulah Falls.

I attended the University of Georgia, graduating in 1991. From living in the region for several years, I can confirm that the Tallulah Falls area is a very popular fall vacation spot for UGA students and alumni. (Along with tourists in general.) 

From that experience I can also verify that a reference to Clemson by the Paige-cited “waitress” from the Tallulah Falls area is very believable. But, in my opinion, for a Tallulah Falls local to specifically reference Georgia Tech football in any context, including a visit to Atlanta, is incomprehensible.

The northeast corner of Georgia, hard against the border of South Carolina and in the bowels of the rugged Blue Ridge Mountains, is a land time conveniently forgot to drag along.

Atlanta is in another country. “When I need new shoes, I go to Atlanta. I don’t go to Atlanta for no football. I ain’t lost nothing there,” the man at the arts and crafts village says.

David and Elizabeth are the innkeepers at the Lake Rabun Hotel, a polished, 16-room wood-and-flagstone lodge with rhododendron furniture and a fireplace. How much for a room and a bath?

“Including tax, that’s $54.50 for the room,” says David.

As someone who has visited the area myself, I was surprised to note Paige’s specific reference to a small hotel being in operation in late January. Most rural, overnight establishments in that region are well-known for being closed during the winter. 

Lake Rabun Hotel

A quick check of a current Frommer’s travel guide on the same “Lake Rabun Hotel” that was referenced by Paige in his January 28, 1994, Denver Post column reported that the hotel annually closes between December and March.

As I currently have a message into someone who will be able to verify whether the Lake Rabun Hotel was closed in January, 1994, I think we’ll stop there.

For now.

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Columnist Confirms Paige Plagiarized Le Batard

EXCLUSIVE: Last week I reported that ESPN’s Woody Paige had lifted quotes from an April 4 story published by SPORTSBUSINESS JOURNAL to fill out his June 5 column in the DENVER POST.

Woody Paige denies he stole column from Dan Le Batard

In SportsBusiness Journal reporter John Ourand’s original story, published over two months ago, he wrote:

Maxwell recalls sitting in an Anaheim, Calif., bar with cable industry icon Bill Daniels, who helped convince Getty Oil to fund ESPN in the early years. It was right after Getty had invested in ESPN, probably 1980. Evey, the Getty Oil executive responsible for overseeing the network, approached the duo, with a look of worry on his face. He asked, “Are we ever going to make money?

It was the first thing he asked Bill,” Maxwell said. “Bill knew it would work. We both thought it was brilliant.” 

Paige’s column, published June 5 in the Denver Post, included word-for-word lifts from the SportsBusiness Journal piece about the history of ESPN:

In an Anaheim, Calif., bar (near a theme park), Daniels was told by a Getty Oil executive about the venture’s problematical plans. Daniels had persuaded the company to buy a majority share of ESPN.

Stuart Evey was concerned Getty Oil had made a mistake. “The first thing he asked Bill was: ‘Are we ever going to make money?’” Colorado cable pioneer Paul Maxwell said. “Bill knew it would work. We both thought it was brilliant.”

That stark similarity prompted the normally mild-mannered Ourand to confront Paige directly on Twitter on June 6 with this Tweet:

Hey @woodypaige. Did you really talk to Paul Maxwell? Or did you lift that quote from SBJ? Bad form to not list source.

Woody Paige Plagiarism

After the fulltime ESPN Around the Horn panelist and longtime Denver Post columnist was cited for plagiarism by SBJ reporter Ourand last week, Paige addressed the issue in a June 7 blog post by Michael Roberts of Denver’s Westword magazine.

“It was not done maliciously or to take credit for something I didn’t do … It was my mistake. …

“We’ve agreed that the columns would be shorter, and my column was about six inches too long. …

“So I cut six inches — and in the final column I turned in, I improperly, incorrectly and unprofessionally cut the attribution to the SportsBusiness Journal. …

“I knew Bill Daniels and wrote about him. He was a friend, and he told me about that stuff — but I didn’t have a direct quote. So doing my due diligence, I found that quote from Mr. Maxwell, who I knew was from Denver, and I thought it added to the fact that Bill Daniels was very instrumental in helping ESPN, and also that ESPN was thinking very seriously about moving here years and years ago. So I put it in — but then I screwed up the entire column by not attributing the quote.

“I don’t know that I chose to be in this limelight, but I chose to be in this business. [The scrutiny of his work] comes with the territory. And I know better.”

After Paige’s admission to Westword’s Roberts that he was aware he hadn’t included the necessary citation to SportsBusiness Journal, the Denver Post added the needed attribution to Paige’s column. Also added by the Post was this line below the story:

Note: This column has been updated from its print version to include an attribution.

The addition of an attribution to SBJ reporter Ourand was not noted by the Post as a correction. Instead, the Post referred to the change as an “update.

After the incident, Paige was not cited for any wrongdoing by the Post or his primary employer, ESPN.

In his remarks to Westwood, Paige refused to admit that he had committed plagiarism but did acknowledge that he had made a “mistake.”

Though in the same article, Paige made no such concession to reporter Roberts in his response to a 2009 plagiarism claim leveled against him by ESPN colleague and MIAMI HERALD columnist Dan Le Batard.

During a MIAMI HERALD reader chat in 2009, Le Batard had this exchange on the Herald’s official website:

Submitted 09/14/09 14:02:46 by Adam from Minnesota

Q: Is Woody Paige a big goofball when he isn’t on Around the Horn? or is it just an act for TV

Answered 09/14/09 14:05:04 by Dan Le Batard
A: no, he’s that….his career has kind of amazed me….my friend call him woody plaige….pre-internet, during a super bowl in miami, i went to ricky jackson’s pahokee home….wrote scene…..described town….had a scene in which ricky was coming home with a big check for his family….a few days later, paige writes the same column….but he never went to the home and he just made up some bait shop and gave some black guy a quote in ridiculous black dialect….this was during denver news wars….the other denver paper called him out on it….even wrote a letter with both columns to the publisher, i think….but it was pre-internet so he never got in trouble…but the people at his paper have to know that he’s pretty reckless

Paige to Westword last week on Le Batard’s accusation:

“I heard that years ago — that I didn’t go to the player’s hometown, which I did, and that I made up a conversation, which I didn’t do.”

The columns in question date to January, 1995, when Paige was covering Super Bowl XXXIX in Miami for the Denver Post and Le Batard was writing for the Miami Herald.

On Jan. 27, 1995, the Miami Herald published a story by Le Batard about the tiny Pahokee, Florida, hometown and family of then-San Francisco 49er and Super Bowl participant Rickey Jackson. In the same 2009 Herald.com reader chat in which he accused Paige of plagiarism, Le Batard gave this thumbnail sketch of his story:

pre-internet, during a super bowl in miami, i went to ricky jackson’s pahokee home….wrote scene…..described town….had a scene in which ricky was coming home with a big check for his family..

On Jan. 29, 1995, the Denver Post published a story by Paige about the tiny Pahokee, Florida, hometown and family of then-San Francisco 49er and Super Bowl participant Rickey Jackson. In the same 2009 Herald.com reader chat in which he accused Paige of plagiarism, Le Batard gave this thumbnail sketch of Paige’s story:

a few days later, paige writes the same column….but he never went to the home and he just made up some bait shop and gave some black guy a quote in ridiculous black dialect

In examining the two pieces, there are a considerable number of remarkable similarities.

Here are some examples:

1) Le Batard’s Jan. 27 article for the Miami Herald contains the passage:

Shaquille O’Neal wears a bulky Superman Logo on his necklace and Deion Sanders wears his uniform number in diamonds and Chuck Carr wears a big gold dollar sign — all celebrations of self. Jackson wears a bigger message on the gold medallion. It says, in large letters, Pahokee, Fla. 33476. It hangs near his heart.

“People in San Francisco are always asking me what my necklace means,” Jackson says. “I tell them it’s home.”

Paige’s Jan. 29 article for the Denver Post contains the passage:

While teammates flash their earrings and diamonds, Jackson wears a gold medallion inscribed with: ‘Pahokee, Fla., 33476.’

“People always want to know what it means. It means home,” Jackson said

2) Le Batard Jan. 27:

“I used to wear a towel on my uniform during games that said ‘Pahokee’ on it, but the NFL wouldn’t let me do that anymore,” Jackson said. “I’m going to wear that towel for the Super Bowl, though. They can fine me the $2,500. This week, no problem.”

Paige, Jan. 29:

Sunday he intends to hang a towel from his uniform that promotes Pahokee. “They’ll fine me the $ 2,500, but it will be worth it.”

3) Le Batard, Jan. 27:

Jackson earned an $838,000 incentive when the 49ers won the NFC Championship. He told his mother he was playing for $38,000, so she wouldn’t worry while watching the game. But the television announcers gave away his secret. She said she was so nervous she wanted to turn the television off.

Paige, Jan. 29:

“I told my mother I was playing against Dallas for $ 38,000. I didn’t want her to worry.” She learned that there was an “8″ in front of the number when it was mentioned on TV during the NFC title game.

4) Le Batard, Jan. 27:

Two big banners hung on office windows — “Rickey Jackson #57″ and “Go 49ers!” When Jackson is playing on television, like he will on Super Bowl Sunday, a blue tint shines through most windows, lighting streets dark and quiet. 

Paige, Jan. 29:

There are two signs on the front door at Harold’s Bait Shop.
FRESH WORMS!
GO RICKEY J AND THE 49ERS!!

Of the above similarities, Tuesday I contacted former ROCKY MOUNTAIN NEWS sports columnist and current lead columnist of the LAS VEGAS REVIEW-JOURNAL Norm Clarke to get his reaction. Clarke was a prominent sports columnist in Denver when the Post published the 1995 Paige column of which Le Batard subsequently claimed plagiarism.

Norm Clarke

(Former Denver columnist Clarke now Las Vegas Review-Journal’s top writer)

Via email messages and a phone conversation, Clarke told me that he also noted the similarities between Le Batard’s work and Paige’s piece in 1995. Clarke wrote in an email Tuesday that after the Denver Post published Paige’s story, he immediately attempted to confirm specific details cited in the Jan. 29 column:

“I recall the 1995 Miami Super Bowl column by Woody that LeBatard mentioned a couple years ago. A colleague from the Rocky Mountain News who was covering that Super Bowl called me and said Woody’s column was raising eyebrows because Woody was seen on a media cruise the day he said he went to Ricky Jackson’s hometown in Pahokee, about an hour north of Miami.

“Since Woody quoted Jackson’s mother in his column, and after hearing that he was seen on the media cruise the same day he was supposed to be in Pahokee, I called Jackson’s home to confirm that Woody had visited Jackson’s mother or, at the very least, done a phone interview with her. I also asked about Le Batard.

“A woman who was taking calls for Jackson’s mother at the time checked with her while I waited on the telephone. The same woman came back and told me that Woody had not visited with or spoken to Jackson’s mother but that she had visited with Le Batard.”

Jackson’s mother was indeed quoted by Paige in his Jan. 29, 1995, column for the Denver Post:

With a rare free afternoon, Jackson showed up at the neat and clean cinder-block house in Pahokee to see his mother, Lelia Pearl Lawson, and write her a check. “It’s the most money I’ve ever seen,” said the school bus driver

As for why Jackson’s mother needed someone to take her calls, as Clarke indicated to me, Le Batard reported in his Jan. 27, 1995, Miami Herald piece:

Lelia Pearl Lawson, Jackson’s mother, says it’s always like this when Rickey comes home — phone ringing, people knocking. “Can’t get no sleep, no rest, no nothing,” she says through a smile. Rickey, who turns 37 in March, is the youngest of her five kids.

Contained in his 2009 Herald.com plagiarism accusation against Paige, Le Batard also reported that his ESPN colleague in 1995, “just made up some bait shop and gave some black guy a quote in ridiculous black dialect.”

From Paige’s Jan. 29, 1995, column:

There are two signs on the front door at Harold’s Bait Shop.
FRESH WORMS!
GO RICKEY J AND THE 49ERS!!

 “Rickey J gets all the free worms he wants,” Harold says. “Iffen he wins the Super Bowl.”

On Tuesday Clarke said in an email that after Paige’s column was published in 1995, he tried at that time to verify whether a “Harold’s Bait Shop” in Jackson’s hometown of Pahokee, Fla., existed.

“I checked to see if there was a bait shop listed [in the area] under the name that Woody cited in his column.

“There was no such bait shop listed in the phone book.”

In addition to the troubling similiarities between the two columns and what appear to be significant inaccuracies contained in Paige’s 1995 Super Bowl piece, Clarke also relayed the following via email:

“When cross-checking Woody’s other Super Bowl columns in the mid-’90s, I discovered that in 1994 (Atlanta), 1995 (Miami) and 1997 (New Orleans), Woody quoted a local in what could be, in all honesty, a believable comment with the word “iffen” sprinkled throughout the quote.”

With Clarke’s remark in mind, I typed the term “iffen” into the Denver Post’s archive search engine. I got four (4) results from that search, which scoured every article published by the Denver Post between 1993 and 2010.

All four results were Woody Paige columns.

Woody Paige Super Bowl columns

Three were the local color Super Bowl columns cited by Clarke. The other “iffen” search result came from a local color piece by Paige from the British Open in Scotland in 2000.

I’ve excerpted all four stories by Paige below.

1) January 28, 1994 Georgia Dome may as well be the Taj Mahal:

TALLULAH FALLS, Ga. - Ralph, with the bad teeth, down at the boat house, seems unconcerned that Buffalo has lost three straight Super Bowls.

“Really?” he said. “Ain’t that somethin’?”

To most people in Rabun County, the Cowboys and the Bills are a couple of dueling banjos. The Super Bowl and the Middle East aren’t big news here.

“Got work to do,” Ralph said. “Football games are for other folks.”

There are no Bills T-shirts and Cowboys caps at the Green Shutters Inn, only hot biscuits and sausage gravy and a cup of coffee that looks and tastes like it was poured out of a car’s crankcase.

Super Bowl is the homemade chili.

“I heard somebody was going to Atlanta for the game, but I’m not sure,” the waitress says. “Who’s playing? Maybe iffen it was Clemson and Georgia Tech, I might be interested. Might not. I work on Sundays.”

2) January 27, 1995 Action Jackson the Prince of Pahokee:

PAHOKEE, Fla. - There are two signs on the front door at Harold’s Bait Shop.

FRESH WORMS!

GO RICKEY J AND THE 49ERS!!

In Pahokee, sushi is what you put on the end of a pole to catch real fish, and San Francisco is on another planet.

But Rickey J - the J is for Jackson - stopped by this week. He is back in the neighborhood for the Super Bowl.

“Rickey J is living the dream for all of us,” says Harold of the bait shop, who has been out gathering fresh worms.

Jackson, a starter on defense for the San Francisco 49ers, earned an $838,000 bonus for winning the NFC championship.

“I am doubting I’ll make that much in my lifetime,” Harold says.

… No matter the result Sunday, Jackson understands that his football career is almost over. “My policy has always been to pick out somebody with a head and try to knock it off. But it’s getting harder.” He eventually plans to return to Pahokee and build his own house and do some fishing.

Which would be just fine for Harold.

“Rickey J gets all the free worms he wants,” Harold says. “Iffen he wins the Super Bowl.”

3) January 26, 1997 Patriots just gator bait for Packers:

WESTWEGO, La. - Back in the bayou, snug in the mud under a moss canopy, Ol’ Chollie isn’t sleeping; he’s just resting his eyes and contemplating the Super Bowl.

Ol’ Chollie is an alligator who will not be somebody’s purse or fried appetizer.

“You don’t want to be foolin’ with Ol’ Chollie,” says Jerry DuPre, Cajun captain of the flat-bottom boat that skulks through the swamp. “He’s mean sumbitch. Bite your arm clean off iffen he had a mind to. This been his piece of the Chacahoula for a longen time.”

The Patriots should have practiced out here with the Swamp Things last week. They will be waist-deep in alligators today in the Super Bowl in the Superdome on the Supercontinent in the Supergalaxy.

4) July 21, 2000 No monsters here, only fools:

LOCH NESS, Scotland - From the olden stone tower at crumbling Urquhart Castle, I spotted the Loch Ness Monster.

“There’s NESSIE,” I shouted and pointed out at the middle of the great lake. “I’ve found her. WOW! I see the monster.”

Sean MacKenzie squinted and said: “‘Fraid ‘at’s a powerboat, laddie.”

… You be sharing with you new friend, laddie,” says Sean, who sounds like Scotty, the “Star Trek” engineer.

After we (mostly I) stared intently into the water for an hour and spied only the powerboat and the random bird, MacKenzie announced that there is no monster, in his opinion. “Iffy there was, she would been dead years ‘go.

Iffen there was no monster reports, there’d be no business.”

… I had made the arduous, adventurous pilgrimage into the northwestern Scottish highlands to behold the elusive sea serpent and solve the fog-shrouded mystery.

“Sorry, laddie. Not many seen the ol’ darlin’ dragon,” said the elderly Scotsman. “Let us retire for a wee bit of the angel’s nectar - whiskey.”

People - especially the boss and the accounting department - always wonder if I make this stuff up. “You can’t believe him. Did he actually go to Loch Ness?”

Yes, I went. Really. Drove on the wrong side of the road the whole way up into the hills (with traces of snow) near the top of Scotland and the whole way back down to the lowlands.

Why, in that last excerpted piece, would Paige write, “the boss and the accounting department - always wonder if I make this stuff up”?

After all, everyone knows an “elderly Scotsman” has the exact same dialect as a “Cajun Captain“, an anonymous North Georgia waitress and an (unconfirmed) owner of an (unconfirmed) South Florida bait shop.

And thanks to Paige, we now know at least one “elderly Scotsman” who refers to his booze as “whiskey” instead of “Scotch”.

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To find all articles mentioned in this post, go here for the Denver Post and here for the Miami Herald.

‘Woody Plaige’: ESPNer Stole Quotes From Story

Today venerable sports media reporter John Ourand noted from his Twitter account that quotes contained in his April 4, 2011, piece about the early history of ESPN for SPORTSBUSINESS JOURNAL were “identical” to remarks reported in a Sunday DENVER POST article containing the byline of full-time ESPN Around The Horn personality and Post columnist Woody Paige.

Woody Paige Plagiarism

(Quotes don’t “look identical” they “are identical” - see below)

In his original work, published over two months ago, Ourand wrote:

Maxwell recalls sitting in an Anaheim, Calif., bar with cable industry icon Bill Daniels, who helped convince Getty Oil to fund ESPN in the early years. It was right after Getty had invested in ESPN, probably 1980. Evey, the Getty Oil executive responsible for overseeing the network, approached the duo, with a look of worry on his face. He asked, “Are we ever going to make money?

It was the first thing he asked Bill,” Maxwell said. “Bill knew it would work. We both thought it was brilliant.” 

Paige’s pirated piece, published yesterday, lifts unattributed quotes word-for-word from Ourand’s April 4 story in SportsBusiness Journal, framing the comments with nearly identical context:

In an Anaheim, Calif., bar (near a theme park), Daniels was told by a Getty Oil executive about the venture’s problematical plans. Daniels had persuaded the company to buy a majority share of ESPN.

Stuart Evey was concerned Getty Oil had made a mistake. “The first thing he asked Bill was: ‘Are we ever going to make money?’” Colorado cable pioneer Paul Maxwell said. “Bill knew it would work. We both thought it was brilliant.”

The obvious theft prompted the normally mild-mannered Ourand to confront Paige directly on Twitter today with this Tweet:

Hey @woodypaige. Did you really talk to Paul Maxwell? Or did you lift that quote from SBJ? Bad form to not list source.

Hours later, Paige had yet to respond. Nor had ESPN, despite Ourand’s sterling reputation as one of the most meticulously accurate reporters in the sports media industry.

This isn’t the first time Paige has been accused of plagiarism by a well-respected sports journalist.

ESPN’s own Dan Le Batard reported to readers on the MIAMI HERALD website in 2009 that Paige once ripped off an entire column from him.

During a reader chat on Sept. 14, 2009, Le Batard was involved in this exchange:

Submitted 09/14/09 14:02:46 by Adam from Minnesota

Q: Is Woody Paige a big goofball when he isn’t on Around the Horn? or is it just an act for TV

Answered 09/14/09 14:05:04 by Dan Le Batard
A: no, he’s that….his career has kind of amazed me….my friend call him woody plaige….pre-internet, during a super bowl in miami, i went to ricky jackson’s pahokee home….wrote scene…..described town….had a scene in which ricky was coming home with a big check for his family….a few days later, paige writes the same column….but he never went to the home and he just made up some bait shop and gave some black guy a quote in ridiculous black dialect….this was during denver news wars….the other denver paper called him out on it….even wrote a letter with both columns to the publisher, i think….but it was pre-internet so he never got in trouble…but the people at his paper have to know that he’s pretty reckless

If they (somehow) didn’t know then, they sure do now.

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