SEC Knew Of Cam Phone Convo For 11 MONTHS?

ESPN is reporting today:

Two sources who recruit for Mississippi State told school compliance officials in January that quarterback Cam Newton and his father each admitted in separate phone conversations that his college choice would be about money.

Did SEC/NCAA coverup Cam Newton Phone Calls?

The sources said that prior to Newton’s commitment to Auburn, Cecil Newton said it would take “more than a scholarship” to get his son to that school and that a third party could provide specifics. Newton was told the school would not meet such a request, according to the sources, who say the information was relayed to SEC officials.

An emotional Cam Newton is said to have later called another Mississippi State recruiter to express regret over changing his commitment to the school but that his father chose Auburn because “the money was too much.”

So according to ESPN, SEC knew about phone conversations which nailed Cam Newton on a pay-for-play scheme?

Let’s revisit what ESPN reported about the SEC’s response to its first report last week about possible impropriety involving Newton’s recruitment:

SEC associate commissioner Greg Sankey, who oversees conference compliance, said the league received “specific information” regarding the Newton allegation in late July of this year.

“When we get information, we share it with the institution when it is involved,” Sankey said.

Without specifically addressing the initial call from Mississippi State, which came several months earlier, Sankey said what the SEC originally was told about the allegation was “limited information.”

“We don’t deal in rumor and innuendo,” Sankey said. “We deal in facts.”

He said the SEC is not an investigative body, adding that it can share information with NCAA enforcement as needed. He declined to say whether the Newton allegation was shared with the NCAA.

Sankey also would not directly comment on whether the league office considers this an ongoing issue or a closed case.

“We’re attentive to a variety of issues at any given time,” he said. “We pay attention to a lot.”

Here’s the key part of that ESPN reportage:

Without specifically addressing the initial call from Mississippi State, which came several months earlier, Sankey said what the SEC originally was told about the allegation was “limited information.”

“We don’t deal in rumor and innuendo,” Sankey said. “We deal in facts.”

According to ESPN, the Newton phone calls took place last January.

Two sources who recruit for Mississippi State said that Cecil Newton and his son, quarterback Cam Newton, admitted in separate phone conversations to a pay-for-play plan while Newton was being recruited late last year.

Mississippi State compliance officials relayed the alleged conversations to Southeastern Conference compliance officials in January, according to two other sources close to the football program.

The SEC’s Sankey said the original call from Mississippi State about Newton, which came “several months” before July, contained “limited information.

Of that original contact, Sankey said, “We don’t deal in rumor and innuendo We deal in facts.

But now according to ESPN, that information included the Newton phone calls.

And what about the NCAA? The ASSOCIATED PRESS reported four days ago:

The NCAA is reviewing the recruitment of Newton, but Auburn has not received a letter of inquiry, the person told The Associated Press on Friday on condition of anonymity because the person was not authorized to comment publicly.

So according to ESPN, the SEC had knowledge of phone conversations personally involving Cam Newton and his play-for-pay scheme and the NCAA has not only done nothing about it for 11 months, but hasn’t even sent Auburn a letter of inquiry?

Either what ESPN is reporting is not true, or the SEC and/or NCAA is involved in coverup that has allowed Newton to play this season for Auburn while eligible.

Or we’re talking abject incompetence on the part of the NCAA and/or SEC.

I’ll be very interested to hear what SEC Commissioner Mike Slive has to say about all of this - because the SEC and NCAA’s handling of this situation is just as important as what Newton is being accused of.

If one or both governing bodies knew about Newton phone conversations 11 months ago and still allowed Newton to remain eligible, we’ve got bigger fish to fry than just Newton.

And I do mean fry.